Jump-starting America by Jonathan Gruber and Simon Johnson

It has become well known that the United States is a divided nation: politically with an increasing polarization, economically with more and more inequalities between poor and rich individuals, and geographically with production concentrated in a few major cities. Starting from this observation, two MIT economists, Jonathan Gruber and Simon Johnson, come up with an … Continue reading Jump-starting America by Jonathan Gruber and Simon Johnson

Should prisons be privatised?

"I believe a big part of our problem is that the very violent inmates, like the three that escaped, [were] sent to private prisons that were just not up to the job”, argued Arizona Attorney General Terry Goddard following the escape of three murderers from Arizona's Kingman private prison on 30 July 2010. According to … Continue reading Should prisons be privatised?

Interview with Julien Grenet from PSE

Julien Grenet is a researcher at the CNRS, an Associate Professor at Paris School of Economics, and one of the founders of the Institut des Politiques Publiques. He is specialised in education economics, public economics and market design. He is known by the general public for his participation in the public debate and the vulgarisation … Continue reading Interview with Julien Grenet from PSE

Should we use new economic methods to assess the impact of collusion on welfare in vertical markets? The example of the “Yoghurt case”

    If literature has widely covered collusion in horizontal markets, it has not given enough attention to collusion in vertical markets, and more precisely on how to properly evaluate the impact of cartels on total welfare. As we observe convictions for collusion among prominent manufacturers, economists try to advise authorities on new approaches to … Continue reading Should we use new economic methods to assess the impact of collusion on welfare in vertical markets? The example of the “Yoghurt case”